Tag Archives: Co-management

Lauren King, Ph.D. Candidate

Who is Lauren King? I am a daughter, sister, aunt, guardian, learner, researcher, feminist, and environmentalist for starters. I’m also a PhD candidate in the Department of Environment and Resource Studies at the University of Waterloo. I have the privilege of working with Dr. Stephen Murphy, a brilliant and eccentric ecologist (I resemble those remarks – SDM), and Dr. Bryan Grimwood, an equally brilliant and thoughtful social scientist. Working with both a natural and social scientist allows me to better understand the complex socio-ecological systems that I am researching. Importantly, I am also honoured to be working with the Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation . This is a strong and vibrant Denesoline community located on the east arm of Great Slave Lake, Northwest Territories.

My research interests are:

  • The establishment, planning, and management of parks and protected areas (PPAs)
  • The negotiation and operation of co-management arrangements for PPAs
  • The application of power theory to the study of co-management
  • The rights, roles, and responsibilities of Indigenous peoples in PPAs governance and environmental governance, more broadly.

I came by my research honestly. When I entered the Master’s in Environmental Studies program at York University in 2010 my academic advisor and I were discussing my research interests and he asked me what I loved? I responded by saying, I love being in nature, paddling my canoe. He proceeded to ask me, why I wasn’t studying something I loved? After that conversation, I decided to study parks and protected areas governance and I’ve never looked back.

My deep respect and appreciation for the environment began as a child along the canoe routes of Ontario and later as a guide, and has evolved through my research and experiences in academia and life experiences. I start each day with a walk through High Park’s ravines with my dog, Darwin, and continue to take every opportunity I can get to explore parks or protected areas (and other natural places), preferably by canoe.

Me

Paddling the Deh Cho (Mackenzie) River from Fort Providence to Inuvik in 2014 (1,500kms!!!)

My PhD research is focused on the negotiation of two co-governance agreements between the Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation, Parks Canada, and the Government of the Northwest Territories for the creation of Thaidene Nene national park reserve and territorial park. The negotiation processes and outcomes will be examined through the lens of power in order to uncover the power dynamics between and among the actors and structures. Following community-based participatory research principles, this research is designed to benefit the Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation, and possibly assist other communities negotiating co-management regimes in areas where Indigenous peoples rights and title remain unresolved. The research findings should also result in important theoretical, conceptual, and methodological contributions to knowledge. Specifically, the application of social power theories to the study of co-management; a central theme in co-management that remains to be thoroughly and systematically examined, and an exploration of the effects that power has on the negotiation phase of co-management; a phase that has been largely ignored by the co-management body of literature. Finally, this research should provide useful insights into the opportunities and challenges of a non-Indigenous, graduate student engaging in community-based participatory research.

I have spent nine years studying different ways to protect, respect, and responsible use the environment and look forward to spending a life-time doing so.

If you would like to connect with me, my email address is ljking@uwaterloo.ca