Monthly Archives: January 2016

2015-2016: Undergraduate Research Projects/Theses

IMG_20151209_150550

This was taken December 2015 at our xmas celebration.  These are actually CaRE undergraduate students, co-op student alumni, & special guest star.

Heather Short, Julie Galloway (c0-advised by Brad Fedy), Brian Studer, Jessica Williamson (alum), Timmy Nassar (alum), Nick Allen (special guest star), Jacob Orlandi (alum & has an IMDB credit – as a baby!), Melody Fraser, Kathryn Russell, Karissa Finlayson, Cameron Curran

Absent: Rachel Hodgson, Ben North, Cooper Sheridan, Jon Jorna

 

Heather worked on a wetland characterization and ecological restoration plan with the City of Kitchener using the Novel Ecosystems framework

lakeside

 

Jon worked on assessing success of ecological restoration in Pioneer Tower Natural Area

Monarda fistulosa 3

 

Brian examined effectiveness at necessity of control of mosquitoes in Waterloo Region

brian

 

Karissa monitored the ecological integrity and potential need for ecological restoration in urban woodlands

IMG_1489

 

Rachel worked on how populations of amphibians respond to urbanization

10109431

 

Melody worked with me and Jonathan Price on management and restoration potential for peat bogs that have been harvested for commercial use

DSCN0646

 

Cameron worked on best practices for ecological restoration of quarries

cameron

 

Kathryn worked with the Long Point Biosphere Reserve on how effective policies for protection have been and how these have changed in the last 30+ years

IMG_20150612_131158

Leigh-Anne Bower (formerly of LPBB – now with a CA) & Brian Craig

 

Ben examined best practices for conservation management of large mammals

One of the challenges for conservation managers is to determine how large mammals like bears will respond to habitat fragmentation, human caused climate change, and other factors.  Ben is seeking to determine strategic approaches to tackling this problem.

valemount bc13

 

Cooper’s research was focused on whether tree planting (mass commercial, nursery-style reclamation) has net carbon benefits or deficits.

While tree planting (nursery-style) is not restoration ecology, it can offer some reclamation benefits to land that would otherwise be degraded.  While there may be better approaches, the mass tree-planting strategy is not likely to end anytime soon.  One interesting question is whether a life cycle analysis will reveal that the energy inputs needs to replant are lower, about equal, or greater than biomass that is the output and how this might affect the carbon source-sink relations, at least at a regional scale.  We do know that forest differ in their carbon relations depending on the species composition, successional stage, overall ‘health’, and local environmental context and conditions.  Cooper aims to examine the tree planting industry as a whole.

IMG_20150611_093601

 This is a local reforested (mass cathedral planting) site
St. Williams Ontario – now undergoing a more ambitious ecological restoration